Lake Miltona Association
HOME     CONTACT US     LOST OR FOUND     VOLUNTEER     DONATE     FOR SALE     PHOTO GALLERY

ABOUT THE LAKE       ABOUT THE ASSOCIATION       LAKE MILTONA GARMENTS
AT WATER'S EDGE       EVENTS & MEETINGS       HERE FISHY FISHY       WATER QUALITY
  Bulrushes
  Dock Talk
  Fertilizer Regs
  Floating Bogs
  Gardening
  Loons About
  Loon Nesting Platforms
 

Loons Give 'em Space

  Septic Info
   
   
 
 
@ Water's Edge - Loons
 
Give 'em Space
https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-1987-08-16-vw-1879-story.html
 

“Loons are so skittish. It’s important that neither the male nor the female sitting on the nest be frightened away. (Because) crows, cranes, raccoons, skunks and other birds and animals hang around waiting for the parent to leave the nest unattended,” Thoma said. “A loon’s egg is a fine feast for a predator,” added the wildlife biologist who has studied loons on Minnesota lakes all his adult life.

Loons are tremendous divers, according to Thoma, who said it’s impossible to tell male from female loon from afar--because one parent always stays on the nest while the other’s out diving for fish to eat. When boats get too close to a loon nest, Thoma added, the bird flys away, abandoning the eggs to predators.

Loons spend about seven months in Minnesota, McIntyre said, then fly to the Atlantic Coast where they winter offshore, feeding on fish. They arrive in Minnesota in April and May, with the thawing of the lakes, and leave in late September and October.

“Loons mate for life. They return to the same lakes each year. We know that by the yodel of the male, a different and distinct one from the other,” the ornithologist explained.

 
“One of the most cherished moments for a Minnesotan is to see a newborn jet black ball of fluff riding on its parents’ back during the first couple of weeks of its life.”
 
 
 
 
 
DISTANCE
 
 
View loons from a respectful distance of at least 200 feet.
You invite predators to eat the loon eggs and chicks if you flush a loon off its nest or separate the chicks from the adults.
 
 
DNR Contact Info
Local DNR Office
Glenwood Area Fisheries Office
10 First Avenue SW, Glenwood, MN 56334
(320) 634-7320
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hosted @ www.gctel.com
Copyright 2016 Lake Miltona Association
Contact Web Administrator