Lake Miltona Association
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  SWIMMER'S INFO
  Swimmer's Itch
   
 
 
WATER QUALITY Swimmer's Itch
 
Swimmer's Itch   Swimmer's Itch is an itchy rash that can occur after you go swimming. Also know as cercarial dermatitis, swimmer's itch is most common in freshwater lakes and ponds.

Swimmer's itch is an allergic reaction to microscopic parasites that burrow into your skin.

Although uncomfortable, swimmer's itch is usually short-lived. The rash typically clears up on its own in a few days. A rash will appear within 12 hours after infection. The infection may last from 2 to 5 days and symptoms can last as long as 2 weeks. Repeat infections are usually worse because people become more sensitive to the larvae and develop stronger allergic responses each time.

Swimmer' itch is not spread from person to person.
 
 
How To Reduce The Odds of Getting Swimmer's Itch
See more info about Swimmer's Itch on the MN DNR website.
 
Owl
 
Raft
 
Suntan Lotion
 
Dry Off with Towel
The cercariae only live for a day or so, and typically swim around the upper few inches of lake water. This increases their chances of coming into contact with waterfowl. Once the cercariae is on the duck, it easily moves around the lake as a parasite, and ultimately along the shoreline.
 
There are actions you can take to help reduce your odds of getting swimmer's itch.
 
1-Keep waterfowl away from your dock or shoreline. Do not feed ducks and geese from your dock. Try putting an owl wind sock or statue on your dock - and move it around occasionally so the waterfowl does not become accustomed to it.
 
2-Stay out of the water by the shore. Swimmer's itch organism may originate somewhere else in the lake but are brought to the shoreline by wave action or currents. You may want to consider swimming from a raft or boat farther out from shore where you are less likely to come into contact with the parasite.
 
3-Apply a water repellant substance such as petroleum jelly, waterproof sunscreen, or other skin oils to reduce the ability of the Cercariae from penetrating the skin.
 
4-Dry off with a towel as soon as you get out of the water. When you get out of the lake, don't let the water evaporate off your skin. The Cercariae in the droplets of water on your skin will look for somewhere else to go as the droplet of water evaporates.
 
 
 
 
 
 
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